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This British Standard specifies a methodology for the visual strength grading of softwood for structural use. The permissible limits of characteristics are specified for two visual strength grades of softwood:

This British Standard provides the means of assessing the quality and strength capabilities of softwood for which characteristic values as strength classes are given in BS EN 338. The assignments of species/grade combinations to those strength classes is given in BS EN 1912, which incorporates the grades defined in this British Standard.

 

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This European Standard specifies requirements for strength graded structural timber with rectangular cross-sections either visual or machine graded, shaped by sawing, planning or other methods and with cross-sectional dimensions complying with EN 336 (referred to as structural timber in the following clauses).

This European Standard:

 

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This British Standard specifies a method of strength grading tropical and temperate hardwood visually for structural use.

This British Standard applies to hardwoods, graded for use in the United Kingdom, for both within the United Kingdom and abroad.

This British standard specifies the means of assessing visually the quality of hardwood for which characteristic values as strength classes are given in BS EN 338. Assignments of species/grade combinations to those strength classes are given in BS EN 1912 which incorporates the grades defined in this standard for which design values are given in BS5268-2 and BS EN 1995-1-1. Additional assignments for grades of UK oak and sweet chestnut are given in PD 6693.

 

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This European Standard establishes a system of strength classes for general use in design codes.

It gives characteristic strength and stiffness properties and density values for each class to which EN 14081-1 refers. It is applicable to all softwood and hardwood timber for structural use, within the scope of EN 14081-1.

A strength class system groups together grades, species and sources with similar strength properties thus making them interchangeable. This then permits an engineer to specify a chosen strength class and use the characteristic strength values of that class in design calculations.

In the UK the most common Strength Classes used for structural softwoods are C24 and C16.

 

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This key standard is referenced by grading standards such as EN 14081 and BS.4978

and defines very strict dimensional tolerances within which structural timber must be produced. These tolerances recognize the slight differences in dimension which may occur within a piece or parcel due to inconsistent sawing or machining.

 

At 20% MC Dimensions < / = 100 mm Dimensions > 100mm
Class T1 Tolerance (-1 +3) mm (-2 +4) mm
Class T2 Tolerance (-1 +1) mm (-1.5 +1.5) mm

 

However, the tolerance classes do not permit consistently under-sized timber, with the Standard clearly stating:

“The average actual thickness and the average actual width of square-edged timber shall not be less than the target sizes.”

Of the two tolerance classes, T1 applies to sawn dimensions and T2, the more stringent requirement applies where some form of processing has taken place.

 

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This European Standard establishes a system of strength classes for general use in design codes.

It gives characteristic strength and stiffness properties and density values for each class to which EN 14081-1 refers. It is applicable to all softwood and hardwood timber for structural use, within the scope of EN 14081-1.

A strength class system groups together grades, species and sources with similar strength properties thus making them interchangeable. This then permits an engineer to specify a chosen strength class and use the characteristic strength values of that class in design calculations.

In the UK the most common Strength Classes used for structural softwoods are C24 and C16.

 

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This European Standard lists the visual strength grades, species and sources of timber, and specifies the strength classes to which they are assigned, as documented in EN 338.

NOTE For the grades, species and sources included, there is a long history of use and/or satisfactory test data. The sources listed therefore are largely determined by existing commercial practice.

 

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